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Cereal commissions call for changes in value creation consultations

(Calgary, Alberta) January 14, 2019 – Western Canadian cereal commissions including the barley, oat and wheat commissions from Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan are calling for major changes in the Government of Canada’s current consultation process on value creation. In a letter to federal agriculture minister Lawrence MacAulay, the commissions say the likelihood of an industry wide agreement on either of the proposed models is low and are asking for more consultation including consideration of other options. Further consultations must focus on engaging producers with a new value proposition.
 
The two models include end point royalties and trailing royalties for wheat, oat and barley seed. Producers provided significant input on these models during recent consultation meetings and the majority of producers were not in favour. Producers put forward alternative options that must be included in further consultations.
 
The commissions agree that there is a need to maintain, sustain and grow research and have been involved in value creation discussions through the Grains Round Table (GRT). However, the GRT has not approved these two models and had requested that AAFC conduct an economic analysis of the two options prior to any farmer consultations. To-date, this analysis has not been done making it impossible for producers to make an informed decision on a path forward. The commissions say the government must put the time and due diligence into this issue to ensure the results are in the best interests of producers. 
 
Canada has a strong public plant breeding system that currently integrates government and producer funding. All cereal commissions in Western Canada recognize the importance of variety development through public plant breeding programs and provide funding for variety development through provincially regulated levies that are mandatory, yet refundable to producers. 

View the letter now

More information on value creation and the proposed models 

For more information:

SaskBarley
Delaney Seiferling
Communications Manager
dseiferling@saskbarleycommission.com
306-250-1099

CMBTC releases 2019-20 recommended malting barley varieties list

 

WINNIPEG The Canadian Malting Barley Technical Centre (CMBTC) has released its annual list of malting barley varieties that hold the most promise for producers in terms of performance, quality and marketability.

The 2019-20 Recommended Malting Barley Variety List includes varieties that have been pilot scale tested by the CMBTC and which exhibit good malting and brewing characteristics. The recommendations are also based on input from grain companies, domestic and international maltsters and brewers, grower associations and seed companies, says Peter Watts, Managing Director of the CMBTC.

“The overall purpose of the list is to help producers choose malting barley varieties with the greatest potential to be selected for malt,” he says.

Canada is recognized by the global malting and brewing industry for high quality barley varieties such as AC Metcalfe and CDC Copeland. However, newer varieties are in the process of being introduced into the marketplace such as AAC Synergy, CDC Bow, AAC Connect, CDC Fraser and Lowe. With excellent malting quality and improved agronomics, including higher yields and better disease resistance, these varieties will ultimately improve Canada’s competiveness and support producer returns.

The CMBTC advises producers to talk to their local elevators, malting companies or grain buyers before making final decisions on which varieties to grow in their region.

View the CMBTC 2019-20 Recommended Malting Barley Varieties list

For more information contact:

Peter Watts, Managing Director, CMBTC
Phone: 204-983-1981
Email: pwatts@cmbtc.com
Twitter: @MaltAcademy ;
YouTube: Malt Academy – CMBTC

About Canadian malting barley usage
Canada is one of the world’s largest suppliers of malting barley and malt to the global brewing industry. In 2017-18 Canada exported approximately 1.5 million tonnes of malting barley worth CDN $500 million and 600,000 tonnes of processed malt at a value of CDN $440 million. The domestic brewing industry in Canada uses 300,000 tonnes of malting barley per year to make 19 million hectoliters of beer.

About the CMBTC
Founded in 2000, the CMBTC is a national, independent, non-profit organization with funding provided by members of the malting barley, malt and brewing industries, producers as well as provincial and federal governments. The CMBTC conducts applied malting and brewing research, providing technical support to members and customers. The CMBTC facilities include a 100 kilogram pilot malt plant and 3 hectolitre pilot brewery. The CMBTC also operates the Malt Academy education program providing instruction in malting and brewing.

CropSphere 2019

CropSphere 2019 will be held at TCU Place, in downtown Saskatoon, with host group AGMs taking place Monday, January 14.

Visit www.cropsphere.com for a full agenda and registration information.

Grade School 2018 – Humboldt

SaskCanola, SaskBarley, and Sask Wheat present Grade School 2018. Learn more about degrading factors in wheat, barley and canola.

Representatives from the Canadian Grain Commission (CGC) will provide grading demonstrations for producers and discuss degrading factors and proper sampling techniques.

Canadian International Grains Institute (Cigi) technical staff will demonstrate the impacts of degrading factors on end product quality for wheat and explain the quality requirements for Canadian wheat around the world.

Event details:

Wednesday, November 28, 2018
Humboldt Uniplex Convention Centre
Leo Parker Way, Humboldt

Registration at 9:00 a.m.
Program begins at 9:30 a.m.
Lunch and refreshments will be provided.

Register now

If you have any questions or concerns prior to the event, please contact one of the host commissions:
SaskBarley: 306-653-7232 or info@saskbarleycommission.com

Grade School 2018 – Swift Current

SaskCanola, SaskBarley, and Sask Wheat present Grade School 2018. Learn more about degrading factors in wheat, barley and canola.

Representatives from the Canadian Grain Commission (CGC) will provide grading demonstrations for producers and discuss degrading factors and proper sampling techniques.

Canadian International Grains Institute (Cigi) technical staff will demonstrate the impacts of degrading factors on end product quality for wheat and explain the quality requirements for Canadian wheat around the world.

Event details:

Tuesday, November 27, 2018
Living Sky Casino 
1401 North Service Rd E, Swift Current

Registration at 9:00 a.m.
Program begins at 9:30 a.m.
Lunch and refreshments will be provided.

Register now

If you have any questions or concerns prior to the event, please contact one of the host commissions:
SaskBarley: 306-653-7232 or info@saskbarleycommission.com

Saskatchewan barley industry responds to Saudi Arabia trade issues

Saskatoon, SK The Saskatchewan Barley Development Commission (SaskBarley) is concerned by the announcement earlier this week that the Saudi Arabia Grains Organization is suspending future purchases of Canadian barley.

Canada is the fourth-largest producer of barley in the world and we rely on exporting our barley to ensure the future of our farmers and industry.

However, while the loss of any export markets is undesirable, Saudi Arabia is a relatively small market. The country purchased 130,000 tonnes of barley in 2017, which is approximately 1.5% of total Canadian barley production. From March 2014—March 2016, Saudi Arabia did not purchase any Canadian barley, and no Canadian barley has been purchased to date in 2018.

“Saskatchewan, and Canadian barley, is known for being consistently high quality and there is demand for it worldwide,” says Jason Skotheim, SaskBarley Chair.

“While we are always disappointed by trade disruptions, we have confidence in our government and our national value chain to respond to trade concerns and work with our global trading partners to maintain and optimize relationships and opportunities for our farmers.”

For more information, please contact:

Delaney Seiferling
Communications Manager
306-321-7533
dseiferling@saskbarleycommission.com

Deadlines for new SCIC malting barley insurance program

Last week, the Saskatchewan Crop Insurance Corporation announced that it would expand its Contract Price Option to include malt barley. In order to participate in this program, producers must do the following by March 31, 2018:

  • Endorse the crop they want to insure
  • Endorse the contract price option

By the deadline of May 31, 2018

  • Provide a copy of their priced contract to SCIC

Deadline: May 31, 2018

Please note: Producers can use the SCIC Contract Price Option calculator to determine what their insured price will be.

For more information:

Visit: www.saskcropinsurance.com
Call: 1-888-935-0000
Or stop into your local Crop Insurance Office

CropSphere 2018 presentations now available

Looking for a presentation from CropSphere 2018? All available presentations are now posted on the CropSphere website.

SaskBarley Board Chair, Vice-Chair to remain unchanged

The SaskBarley Board of Directors voted today that the Board Chair and Vice-Chair would remain unchanged for 2018/2019.

The current Chair will remain Jason Skotheim, and the current Vice-Chair will remain Brent Johnson.

SaskBarley Board of Directors to Remain Unchanged

The Saskatchewan Barley Development Commission (SaskBarley) announced today that the three positions up for election on its Board of Directors have been filled by the three incumbents of these positions, Jason Skotheim of Saskatoon, Brent Johnson of Strasbourg, and Allen Kuhlmann of Vanguard.

The nomination period for these positions closed this past Friday, September 15, at 4PM.

All three of the acclaimed Directors have been serving on the Board since SaskBarley’s first elected Board of Directors took office in January 2014 and are eager to continue making progress in pursuing the organization’s strategic goals.

“Barley growers in Saskatchewan have sent us a message that our Board is on the right track and that no major changes are required,” says Skotheim, who also serves as Board Chair. “We will take this feedback and continue our work to ensure that barley has a strong future as a Saskatchewan crop.”

“One of the areas of particular interest to me is growing the market opportunities for barley as a key feed ingredient,” says Johnson, who also serves as Vice-Chair. “One of my priorities going forward will be to continue to pursue research investments that will explore and confirm the valuable role that barley can play as feed so that we can establish sustainable growth in demand for this crop.”

“One of our greatest challenges for barley is ensuring that growers can continue to profitably grow this crop, and that there is sustainable and diverse demand for it,” says Kuhlmann, who serves as Finance Chair and who brings with him many years’ of experience on other agricultural Boards, including the Saskatchewan Flax Development Commission. “This is a long-term endeavor, which I am pleased we will be able to continue to work on with the same committed Directors that helped form SaskBarley’s original strategic plan in 2014.”

For more information, please contact:

Delaney Seiferling
Communications Manager
306-321-7533
dseiferling@saskbarleycommission.com